The National Health Service Corps: Cutting Student Debt and Promoting Primary Care

By Christy Crisologo

It was Pauline Rolle’s grandmother who first opened her eyes to the needs of underserved communities in the United States.

“There are people all over the world who need you,” the pediatrician’s grandmother told her, “but there are also people right here who need you.” After completing her training, those words inspired Dr. Rolle to apply for the National Health Service Corps’s Loan Repayment Program. Today she works at the Duval County Health Department clinic in Jacksonville, FL, serving primarily Medicaid and uninsured patients.

“The program is just awesome — it’s just fabulous,” Dr. Rolle said in an article featured on the NHSC website. “The connectivity among public health providers, the conferences, and the educational credits that they offer — not to mention the support in terms of loan repayment — it’s just a tremendous blessing to me and my family.”

Read more

A U.S. Medical Student’s Experience in Germany

As a medical student from the U.S., it is always fascinating to experience how medical care is delivered in other countries. As our health care expenditures balloon to unprecedented levels, the topics of medical care and medicine in general have never been more pervasive. From this dialogue, comparisons between the U.S. and international health care systems are naturally made, but few people outside of those who do medical tourism, international rotations, or medical humanitarian work actually experience the differences firsthand. Experiencing medicine in countries with drastically different systems than the U.S. is highly valuable for U.S. medical students, both in clinical practice and in understanding the business and legal aspects of medicine.

Read more

20 Questions: Richard A. Sheff, MD, Author

Richard A. Sheff, author of Doctor Confidential: Secrets Behind the Veil, is a Rhode Island family physician with over 30 years of experience in medicine. Dr. Sheff received his MD from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine before serving his residency with Brown University Division of Family Medicine at The Memorial Hospital in Pawtucket, Rhode Island.
After practicing family medicine in Massachusetts for 12 years and teaching at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston for a decade, Dr. Sheff launched a company, CommonWell, with the goal of helping the healthcare system integrate the best of complementary and alternative medicine with the best of conventional medicine. He also began consulting with hospitals and physician organizations in the U.S. and internationally.

Read more

Opportunities in the Indian Health Service

 
Students may not be aware of the variety of opportunities available within the Indian Health Service (IHS).
To learn more about IHS and the volunteer, scholarship, and employment opportunities available, the Student Doctor Network recently spoke with Dr. Charles North, retired Chief Medical Clinical Officer for Indian Health Services.
Charles North attended medical school at the University of Pittsburgh and completed his residency at the University of Minnesota.  Currently, he serves as Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine.
Would you explain what the Indian Health Service is?
Gladly. The Indian Health Service (www.ihs.gov) is an agency within the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Since IHS is designated as an agency or “Operating Division” within HHS, it is a parallel organization to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and several others.

Read more

20 Questions: Gary Flashner, MD [Family Medicine]

 
Dr. Gary Flashner, MS, MD, ABFP is an emergency physician and Vice President of Medical Content for ExitCare, LLC.    He completed his undergraduate work at Muhlenberg College (Allentown, PA), Masters work at Penn State, medical school at Thomas Jefferson University, and residency in Family Medicine at Sacred Heart Hospital (Allentown, PA).    His 20 years of clinical practice and teaching endeavors (including 13 years of full-time work in hospital-based emergency medicine) were split between the eastern U.S. (Pennsylvania and Ohio) and California, including working at Yosemite National Park.

Read more

Family Medicine: Challenges for the Solo Physician

 
The family physician, in the eyes of many medical students, is a solo physician with a comprehensive practice that treats patients over their entire lifespan. While this type of practice is possible, solo physicians, especially those in urban and suburban areas, are facing many challenges as they try to sustain full-scope solo practice in today’s healthcare climate.
Family medicine was born as a specialty in the early 1970’s in response to the increasing specialization of American physicians following World War II. The number of U.S. physicians who designated themselves as “general practitioners” decreased from 79.2% in 1938 to 17.3% in 1970, while self-designated “specialists” increased from 20.8% to 75.7%1. The specialty was designed to train physicians who would provide general medical services for patients of all ages, and would treat patients in an emotionally supportive manner that was consistent with the values of the patients’ community.

Read more