Q&A with Dr. Emma Stanton, Psychiatry, Population Mental Health

Dr. Emma Stanton is a psychiatrist and Regional Chief Partnerships Officer at Beacon Health Options, a company which is uses a data-driven approach to work with mental health service providers across the US. She is also CEO of its international subsidiary Beacon UK, co-founder and director of the mentorship network Diagnosis, and a General Advisory Council Member at The Kings Fund.
Dr. Stanton obtained her medical degree from Southampton University (2000), completed her MRCPsych from the Royal College of Psychiatrists (2005), and obtained her MBA at Imperial College London (2009).
Prior to working at Beacon Health Options, Dr. Stanton completed her clinical training at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. She has also served as Clinical Advisor to the Chief Medical Officer at the Department of Health in London, which included placements to BUPA and the World Health Organization. Continue reading “Q&A with Dr. Emma Stanton, Psychiatry, Population Mental Health”

What to Expect as a Med School Spouse: Years 3 and 4

With Step 1 completed, and hopefully after a little R&R, your spouse is ready to get out there and try their hard-won knowledge in the clinics! Also coming up, your spouse will be selecting a specialty and starting the process of researching residency programs. They will put their application package together, go through the interview process, rank the programs, and wait for the much anticipated Match Day, then graduation! It will be a lot in a short amount of time, so here’s your breakdown of what to expect! Continue reading “What to Expect as a Med School Spouse: Years 3 and 4”

Board Preparation: Training for a Marathon, not a Sprint 

The first key to success on the boards is using practice questions to develop your “hunch reflex.” If you’re a second year medical student, “kinda-sorta” thinking about a certain test you’ll have to take in about six months, and you haven’t already begun using USMLE/COMLEX-style practice questions in your study, you should start now. Even if you’re just half way through first year, start incorporating the following advice into your study plan: questions, questions, questions! Continue reading “Board Preparation: Training for a Marathon, not a Sprint “

Q&A with Physician-Authors Dr. Khurram Mehtabdin and Dr. Omar Mirza

Dr. Khurram Mehtabdin and Dr. Omar Mirza are doctors by day, comic book creators by night. Their series,  Zindan: The Last Ansaars,  is the bestselling comic book in Pakistan through  CFxComics. Since their 2014 debut, they’ve seen a 150% increase in sales at United States Comic Cons. A saga of South Indian superheroes and supervillains set in the 17th century Mughal Empire, it focuses on two orphans who struggle with their traumatic pasts as they recapture evils unleashed from the prison Zindan. I interviewed the creators at New York Comic Con 2016. Sheltered from the crush of Harley Quinns, Deadpools, and My Little Pony cosplayers, we sat in their red exhibition tent and discussed feminism in Muslim culture, Pakistani immigrant identity in the context of 9/11, and which preteen YouTube sensation they most identify with. Continue reading “Q&A with Physician-Authors Dr. Khurram Mehtabdin and Dr. Omar Mirza”

Sustainability: How Your Partnership Can Survive and Flourish During a Medical Education and Career

Happy New Year from Student Doctor Network! I have always loved the beginning of a new year. It’s a time to reflect on the past, look ahead to the future, find a fresh perspective on your life and situation, and create new wishes for yourself and your family going forward. There is an electricity that surrounds us and gives us hope that not only can we achieve what we’re dreaming of, but we can also find more happiness and fun in our lives. Continue reading “Sustainability: How Your Partnership Can Survive and Flourish During a Medical Education and Career”

What You Should Know: Exploring Techniques for Nonpharmacological Pain Control

What You Should Know is an ongoing series covering a range of informational topics relevant to current and future healthcare professionals.
Pain assessment and control is something which every doctor going into practice will have to face, regardless of his or her specialty. Pain is the number one reason why Americans seek out medical treatment in the first place and is estimated that some 50 million Americans suffer from some form of chronic pain – at a cost to the US health system of $100 billion a year. It is the leading cause of disability for Americans over the age of 45 and carries with it tremendous health and social costs to patients, their families and society as a whole. Continue reading “What You Should Know: Exploring Techniques for Nonpharmacological Pain Control”

The Chemistry of Gender and Coming Out in Medical School

“Is it trans or cis?” It’s a question that has tortured many pre-professional students studying organic chemistry for the better part of a century. Effectively learning stereochemistry and its notation really comes down to the permutations of trans, cis, and chiral centers. I think one of my mentors summed it up best when I asked him if he found Organic Chemistry useful in medical school and in his practice as a physician: “Yep, I finally learned how to pronounce all those shampoo ingredients!” Continue reading “The Chemistry of Gender and Coming Out in Medical School”

Medical Students and Mental Health

Mental health is a topic which is discussed more openly in our society in recent decades and is, slowly, become less stigmatized. This, ironically, does not seem to be the case when it comes to the issue of mental health problems among medical students. The nature of medical school, and attitudes of medical students themselves, can set up barriers between students who need help and the programs that can help them. This article looks at the widespread nature of this problem in American and overseas medical schools, and also what can be done to help solve it. Continue reading “Medical Students and Mental Health”

Residents and Fellows: Your Guide to the Right Career Path

You’ve earned your medical degree, worked your way through your residency or fellowship program and are now on your way to a career as a full-time physician. But what career path should you take — work in a hospital setting, join a private practice, start your own practice, or even work locum tenens assignments on a part-time or permanent basis?
Here are some tips to help you decide the best career option for you. Continue reading “Residents and Fellows: Your Guide to the Right Career Path”

The Soft Skills You Need to be a Leader in Medicine

Medicine needs a strong core of leadership now more than ever. Medical students and new physicians spend massive amounts of time training and studying the basics of medicine, yet they may not be receiving training in many of the soft skills required to be a leader in today’s medical environment.
Being knowledgeable about disease and various forms of treatment is absolutely vital, but soft skills are what separates a good physician from a great physician. These skills include communication, collaboration, and confidence. As physicians, we are expected to practice as a team, and ultimately be the leader of that team. Let’s discuss how you can prepare to be a leader in medicine. Continue reading “The Soft Skills You Need to be a Leader in Medicine”