Unwanted Sexual Attention From Patients

By The Short Coat Podcast

Do med students get training on how to deal with sexual attention from patients?

Listener Zipadee Doodah (not her actual name) was the victim of unwanted sexual attention from a patient.  Because her employer didn’t have a policy in place to deal with it, she fought for one.  But she wonders, what sort of training do medical students get on dealing with unwanted advances from patients?  Kaci McCleary, Erik Kneller, Eric Schnieders, and newbie co-host Cheryl Wang offer their perspectives. Plus we consider a clever approach from a restaurateur who was surprised to learn that her efforts to create a welcoming, inclusive place of business nevertheless masked a simmering harassment problem.  How she and her crew dealt with it might be a model for medicine. Continue reading “Unwanted Sexual Attention From Patients”

Night Float: Finding Mentors, Being a Mentor

Mentorship–both giving and receiving–is a crucial part of being a resident

Keenan Laraway
Keenan Laraway

Keenan Laraway, MD

Short Coat Podcast veteran Keenan Laraway, MD (CCOM ’15, Internal Medicine), returns to the microphone to give his insights into one of the most important parts of residency–finding and being a mentor.  As you listen, note how much credit he gives to his mentors for their influence on him, and how much emphasis he gives to teaching medical students himself.  Medical residency (and undergraduate medical education, partially) operates on an apprenticeship model, in which the experience and advice of one’s colleagues is integral to one’s own development.  Seeking out those relationships is therefore vital. Continue reading “Night Float: Finding Mentors, Being a Mentor”

Tests, Tact, and Turpentine

Everyone gets anxious about tests.  And med school features a lot of tests.

The news that students at Oregon Health and Science University will now be subject to ‘compassion tests‘  in order to graduate got Dave thinking about test anxiety.  As schools pile on the examinations, how do students deal with the stress?  Dabin Choi, Gabe Conley, Claire Casteneda, and Erik Kneller discuss meditation, sleep, prayer, and eating habits that keep them from letting the fear derail them. Continue reading “Tests, Tact, and Turpentine”

Q&A with Ginny McCarthy, Director of Health Sciences Division Ministry

rich ronnestad

By Jacob Adney, SDN Staff Writer

Ask any doctor, in any specialty and of any age, and they will remember their training in medical school. It is full of learning, new experiences, new friends, and major strides in both personal and professional development. With so many changes, dozens of obstacles in each student’s life must be confronted and overcome. Fortunately, medical schools have extraordinary people who devote their time and talent to guiding and supporting medical students through their four years. This column interviews these people at medical schools around the country to help students learn more about the resources they have available during their years in school.

In our fifth installment, I interviewed Ms. Ginny McCarthy. Ms. McCarthy is the Director of Health Sciences Division Ministry at Loyola University Chicago. She is currently working toward her Master of Public Health. Ms. McCarthy is married and has three children, enjoys running and cooking, and is grateful for continued opportunities for learning and growth. Continue reading “Q&A with Ginny McCarthy, Director of Health Sciences Division Ministry”

The Physician Gender Bias—What Every Female Doctor Has Faced

gender bias

By Karen Tran-Harding, SDN Staff Writer

A man and a woman step into an elevator wearing the exact same hospital scrub uniforms. The man’s pager suddenly starts beeping and the stranger in the elevator says to him, “Do you doctors really still use pagers?” The stranger then notices the women next to him and asks her, “Oh, are you a nurse?” Continue reading “The Physician Gender Bias—What Every Female Doctor Has Faced”

The Truth About "Primary Care" Statistics

How to Think About Med Schools’ Primary Care Statistics

Listener Lavender BloodPoison (not their real name) sent us a message saying they were impressed by CCOM’s Primary Care residency match statistics. And while many schools that serve states like ours do love primary care, “there are lies, damn lies, and statistics,” as the saying goes. How should one interpret match statistics in light of the fact that many who appear to match in primary care will go on to specialize after their first year residency? Lisa Wehr, Teneme Konne, Aline Sandouk, Amy Young, and Kaci McCleary are here to drop some truths about the so-called “Dean’s Lie” (less a lie as much as it is a truth that doesn’t tell the whole story). Continue reading “The Truth About "Primary Care" Statistics”

Putting the Anxiety Cart Before the Horse

Anxiety about your competitive specialty ambitions in your first year isn’t worth it.

Listener Luis wrote in expressing his anxiety that his med school–which he’ll begin attending this fall–doesn’t have the prestige or programs to support his desire for a competitive specialty like ophthalmology. If that’s the case, he wondered, what can he do to increase his chances of obtaining his dream career? Fortunately for Luis, Irisa Mahaparn, Gabe Conley, Brendan George, Jason Lewis, and new co-host Andres Dajles were on hand to give Luis the advice and encouragement he needs…and a tiny dose of tough love, too. Continue reading “Putting the Anxiety Cart Before the Horse”

Changing Your Mind—And Your Specialty

changing your mind

By Brent Schnipke, SDN Staff Writer

I’ve written about choosing a medical specialty throughout the third and even fourth years of medical school, but further discussion is warranted regarding the students who don’t choose a specialty in this “typical” timeframe. It is worth mentioning first of all: many people change their minds for many different reasons. I continue to be impressed by the students, residents, and attendings I meet who took circuitous and sometimes truly fascinating routes to become physicians. The same is true for finding one’s niche as a certain type of physician. Many students feel like everyone else has things figured out, but the truth is the path is not always clear cut. Even when the majority achieve a certain stage (e.g. practicing physician) by the standard route, there are always exceptions, and students may be surprised and encouraged at the myriad ways they can reach their career goals. Continue reading “Changing Your Mind—And Your Specialty”

Entering Third Year With An Open Mind

I went into my third year with a somewhat open mind in terms of what I thought I liked and what I thought I wanted to do for the next 35 years or so of my life. Internal medicine interested me because you had to know so much about, well, so much. I felt like my brain was getting bigger every day I was on my internal medicine rotation—there was just so much to know! The number of patients you can see is also fairly high on a typical internal medicine service. On the other hand, I had completely discounted general surgery—I was never very interested in anatomy class and didn’t particularly enjoy teasing apart membranes from fascia from blood vessels and nerves. The thought of doing that for the rest of my life didn’t sit well with me. But, nevertheless, I went in with an open mind. Continue reading “Entering Third Year With An Open Mind”

Should You Consider Romance When Selecting a Med School?

Med school can test a relationship.

Lauren wrote in to ask us to what extent her love life should play a role in her selection of a medical school, and how we thought med school challenges relationships. Gabe Conely, Joyce Wahba, Claire Casteneda, and new host Brendan George discussed their perspective on how med school can affect romantic relationships, and what role it should play in the selection of a school to attend. Continue reading “Should You Consider Romance When Selecting a Med School?”