The MCAT Scoring Process: Your Questions Answered

MCAT scoring

By AAMC Staff

When you receive your score report, you will receive five scores—four scores for each of the multiple-choice sections of the exam and one total score. As you prepare for test day, you may wonder how the AAMC calculates your scores. Or perhaps you’ve heard some theories about how we do it. To help dispel any myths, we’ve answered three of your frequently asked questions about how the MCAT exam is scored.   Continue reading “The MCAT Scoring Process: Your Questions Answered”

3 Study Strategies for the Behavioral Sciences on the MCAT

behavioral science

By Cassie Kosarek

As essential as it is to know the pathophysiology of various diseases and the pharmacological and surgical interventions used to treat them, it is also necessary to understand the social and psychological aspects of illness in order to effectively treat patients. Physicians must situate their treatments within psychosocial parameters that best serve the individual patient, asking questions like, “What will motivate this patient to take his medication as prescribed?” and “How do the social supports of this single parent influence his or her ability to get his/her child to well-visits with the pediatrician?” Continue reading “3 Study Strategies for the Behavioral Sciences on the MCAT”

Should You Retake the MCAT? 3 Key Things to Consider

retake the mcat

By Andrew George

Studying your butt off for months, suffering through an anxiety-inducing test day, and then waiting an entire month just to get a lower-than-expected MCAT score is by no means a pleasant experience. It is so bad in fact that many students decide to quit trying to go to medical school altogether. But please don’t despair. You may still have a good chance without needing to take the MCAT again. Let’s consider three things that will help you decide on what steps to take next: Continue reading “Should You Retake the MCAT? 3 Key Things to Consider”

4 New Year’s Resolutions for MCAT Test-Takers

Plotting out your course of study in anticipation of any MCAT test date is difficult enough, but between November and the beginning of January, this task may be even more challenging. In the midst of holiday shopping, holiday cooking, gatherings, and festive sweaters, medical school hopefuls might find that their MCAT prep books accumulate a little less wear-and-tear then they’d like. If you find yourself struggling with MCAT prep during the holidays, use these tips come January to get back on track. Continue reading “4 New Year’s Resolutions for MCAT Test-Takers”

Q&A with Andrew Nimmich, Co-Founder of Tutor the People

Tell us about yourself
Hi SDN! My name’s Andrew. I am a fourth-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine. I am currently on the interview trail for residency. My wife Eliza and I started a tutoring company called Tutor the People after I took the MCAT and was applying for medical
school. We are now working to launch Nerdly, an online tutoring platform. I am interested in all things education, technology, and medicine related. Continue reading “Q&A with Andrew Nimmich, Co-Founder of Tutor the People”

5 Steps to Earning a 90th-Percentile MCAT Score

Famous Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz once remarked, “When my teams took second place, the fans called me an idiot. A guy who finished last in medical school is still called a ‘doctor’. Hardly seems fair.”
Lou’s pithy comment may be true for students already in medical school. However, if you are a premed student, finishing last, or even in the middle of the pack, dooms your chances of going to a quality medical school. Every year, students face fierce competition. Scoring “above average” isn’t enough. To be highly competitive as an out-of-state applicant at schools across the country, you need a strong MCAT score—usually in the 90th percentile or above. Continue reading “5 Steps to Earning a 90th-Percentile MCAT Score”

5 Ways to Study for the MCAT Using Your Smart Phone

You can do almost anything with your smart phone these days. You can video call a friend in China, order pizza with the click of a button, and even see in the dark! So, if your smart phone can help you do these and an almost infinitely large number of other things, then why can’t you use it to study for the MCAT? In this article, I am going to show you that you not only can, but should use your smart phone to study for the MCAT. Here are 5 ways that you can start using your iPhone to study for the MCAT right now: Continue reading “5 Ways to Study for the MCAT Using Your Smart Phone”

4 Ways to Address a Low MCAT Score on Your AMCAS Application

Overcoming a low MCAT score on your AMCAS application can feel daunting. Can they really judge my whole application by my performance on one 8 hour block of life!!? Sadly, most schools do put extensive emphasis on MCAT scores. However, a low score is not the end of the world if you are within the range of applicants to a particular school. Ask yourself: What do medical schools look for? The answer is more dynamic than just a good MCAT score… Continue reading “4 Ways to Address a Low MCAT Score on Your AMCAS Application”

Critical Reading: Building Analysis and Reasoning Skills with Confidence

Anyone who has taken or studied for the MCAT Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS)—or any other critical reading test—will tell you that these tests can be incredibly challenging. Why is that true, given that people studying for the MCAT CARS are typically good students? There are several reasons why. Part of the challenge is the subject matter in the passages. Many individuals have not read extensively outside of their disciplines–especially in the humanities and social sciences. Another challenge is that many people today aren’t used to reading material that is written much above the high school level, even college students. Thus, many readers are uneasy with complex sentence structures and elaborate or abstract language. In addition, analyzing and reasoning from material in a new discipline or in a style that is unfamiliar to you is difficult. It can require extra thought for anyone. However, these and other reading challenges don’t need to be roadblocks to your success when you take the MCAT or any other test that involves critical reading. Critical reading, analysis, and reasoning are skills that can be learned and practiced. This article is designed to help you understand the skills you’ll need to read effectively and approach testing for the MCAT CARS and other critical reading tests. Continue reading “Critical Reading: Building Analysis and Reasoning Skills with Confidence”